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THE REASON WHY AMERICANS SAY MATH AND NOT MATHS  

spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
29830 posts
11/1/2021 9:54 am
THE REASON WHY AMERICANS SAY MATH AND NOT MATHS



When I visited New York for the first time in the 1980s, I went to a bookshop and was amazed that there were American English dictionaries on sale. On browsing a dictionary, it dawned on me how different American English is to British English.

Since I started blogging years ago, this difference between American English and British English became even more apparent. I’ve had to become bilingual in reading American people’s blogs to fully understand them and in writing my own blog to ensure I’m understood by Americans.

I always knew Americans spelt things differently. Organisation becomes organization; centre becomes center; programme becomes program, behaviour becomes behaviour, colour becomes color, grey becomes gray, and pyjamas become pajamas. I’ve put this down to the whimsy of Americans. But American spelling of English words often means less letters to type out so their whimsy makes a lot of sense as it saves time.

Some American words, because of American films and music, have become mainstream here. People often say movies to mean films, apartments to mean flats, mail to mean post, truck to mean lorry, and ass to mean arse.

But I still sometimes get confused with the many different words used to describe the same thing. For example, here in the UK, we generally say Autumn not Fall, toilet not restroom, bum not fanny, university not college, prison not penitentiary, trade union not labor union, full stop not period, maths not math, mobile phone not cellphone, queue not line, lift not elevator, underground not subway, holiday not vacation, nappy not diaper, rubber not eraser, waistcoat not vest, trousers not pants, jumper not sweater, trainers not sneakers, pissed off not pissed, bill not check, postman not mailman, probation officer not parole officer, doctor not physician, postcode not zip code, shop not store, chemist not drugstore, off-licence not liquor store, torch not flashlight, crisps not chips, chips not fries, biscuits not cookies, sweets not candy, jelly not jello, aubergine not eggplant, courgette not zucchini, sweet corn not maize, cooker not stove, tin not can, rubbish not trash, dustbin not garbage can, wardrobe not closet, garden not yard, motorway not highway, caravan not trailer, bonnet not hood, boot not trunk, car park not parking lot, petrol not gas, and definitely football not soccer.


What American-English or British-English words confuse you?
Do you say Maths or Math?
Have you become more bilingual in American English and British English on blogland?


But there are few words when used could lead to major misunderstandings depending where you are. If an American asked me for chips, I’d give them fries when they really wanted crisps! If an American told me they were pissed, I’d think there were drunk and not angry! If an American asked me to look inside their trunk, I’d enjoy myself rummaging around their suitcase! If an American wanted a cookie, I'd say that I haven't got that type of biscuit and offer them a custard cream biscuit instead! If an American admired my wife’s fanny, I’d think my wife must have flashed her pussy at them! And if an American asked to borrow my pants, I’d ask for money if they so badly wanted to satisfy their kinks by wearing my game-worn underwear!

My only bugbear about American English is when Americans say math and not maths because mathematics is a plural word. But, having said that, the Americans are yet again saving a letter from the word being typed out. It saves time; the reason why Americans say math and not maths is because they are very busy people in a hurry!








spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/1/2021 9:55 am

Winston Churchill once said, “Americans and British are one people separated by a common language.”


Tmptrzz 59F  
107038 posts
11/1/2021 12:07 pm

I had never given much thought how we say words so differently although I do know many of the words you all use in the UK. They are quite interesting too, I have to say as I love the word BUM, as we don't use that hear. Most usually say ASS lol.

What American-English or British-English words confuse you? They don't really confuse me
but some of the food words did at first but I have got to know them pretty well for the most part.

Do you say Maths or Math? I say Math as that's what we were taught in school.

Have you become more bilingual in American English and British English on blogland?
Me bilingual no not really but it is fun learning words that mean the same thing but are different from other countries.

I hope you enjoy your Monday in November, and may it be a great start to your week..

Seduce the mind and see what a wonderful adventure the body will take you on..


author51 59F  
130010 posts
11/1/2021 12:44 pm

I have done a few posts over the years on the difference between spellings of certain words between Canadians and Americans because Canadians also put the U in everything..lol.Try living next door to them and getting made fun of for how Canadians spell things differently from my neighboUrs to the South, due to being part of the British Commonwealth..Add in French Canadians into the mix and my fellow Canadians who live in the Maritimes, Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island. Every single country in this world has different pronunciations due to accents, different ways to spell the same word, yet they mean the same.
I do not follow American English as it is not my country. I cater to my own countries spellings, meanings and dialect...


citizen4722 64M  
74582 posts
11/1/2021 2:02 pm

What American-English or British-English words confuse you? - "Could care less" is said in America but "can't care less" is said in the UK. It means the same?...that's very confusing.


justskin1 70M  
13175 posts
11/1/2021 3:03 pm

Winston was so right about our language. Watching BBC programs has made me more British language literate and blog posts here have expanded my knowledge of the differences. I knew most but not all of the different terms you listed. Thank You.

I am not sure if it is true but I read that when Webster compiled his dictionary he deliberately used different spellings to accent the differences between Britain and the US. He thought his take was superior. Still, not sure how so many items came to have such different names. I have come to try to abandon the term Fanny Pack, ie the pouch worn around the waist, since I learned that to you Brits, fanny does not mean bum but something a bit forward on a female.

If you see me in the real world, come say "Hi Justskin."

I always behave. Preferably not well.


staci_19702 51T  
3767 posts
11/1/2021 3:27 pm

I’m fascinated. It’s so interesting.
I’m going to start saying maths from here on out!!

Have a great day! 💋
Staci


MyBaffies 52M
4983 posts
11/1/2021 3:36 pm

I wonder if it is due to the import of many American TV series (or seasons) over here.

Do Americans pick up and use any British English words or do they just stick with their own?

Baffies

Link to my blog: MyBaffies


Paulxx001 65M  
22616 posts
11/1/2021 3:46 pm

Having been exposed to British humour — over here in the land of the maple 🍁 leaf — on TV and radio, there's not much that confuses me. I can see both sides of the coin.
It helps to hear someone speak — then I'll know what they mean. I might read a sentence over; to be sure I have it right. 😊❗❗


MustaschRide99 70M
327 posts
11/1/2021 6:43 pm

I once worked with a British Engineer from Singapore, and while sitting in a bar one night, he promptly announced he needed to go out for a fag! I had no idea he needed to go outside for a cigarette!


PonyGirl1965 56F  
22090 posts
11/1/2021 10:23 pm

What American-English or British-English words confuse you? I don't think any mainstream words confuse me. I don't know all the British regional words. I'm learning.
Do you say Maths or Math? Math
Have you become more bilingual in American English and British English on blogland? Yes. I read enough books growing up to have all the basic words in my brain


pal334 67M  
45821 posts
11/2/2021 6:22 am

After so many years in the military and travel to other countries I am much more comfortable with the languages. I use Math, just something more comforatble for me. I don't think I am bi lingual but I do enjoy it

Please cum visit my blog,,,,,,,,,,,,pal334



lok4fun500 M  
51906 posts
11/2/2021 12:17 pm

I don't think aboot it!
I say "math" ..................arithmetic when I was a youngster! but then, I'm Canadian!


cozzycouple 64M/64F  
588 posts
11/3/2021 3:39 am

Oh the joy of it.
There is American-English, all versions from each direction of the compass
There is British - English
The rest of British Isles speak another dialect of English all together
The Canadians speak some form of English .... "aboat"
Then you lot haven't dealt with Australian - English,
commonly refered to as "Strine".
Get your dictionaries out on that one, people


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 7:26 am

    Quoting Tmptrzz:
    I had never given much thought how we say words so differently although I do know many of the words you all use in the UK. They are quite interesting too, I have to say as I love the word BUM, as we don't use that hear. Most usually say ASS lol.

    What American-English or British-English words confuse you? They don't really confuse me
    but some of the food words did at first but I have got to know them pretty well for the most part.

    Do you say Maths or Math? I say Math as that's what we were taught in school.

    Have you become more bilingual in American English and British English on blogland?
    Me bilingual no not really but it is fun learning words that mean the same thing but are different from other countries.

    I hope you enjoy your Monday in November, and may it be a great start to your week..
Bum is a very popular word here. Usually it means ass, but it can mean a layabout or even good.


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 7:30 am

    Quoting author51:
    I have done a few posts over the years on the difference between spellings of certain words between Canadians and Americans because Canadians also put the U in everything..lol.Try living next door to them and getting made fun of for how Canadians spell things differently from my neighboUrs to the South, due to being part of the British Commonwealth..Add in French Canadians into the mix and my fellow Canadians who live in the Maritimes, Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island. Every single country in this world has different pronunciations due to accents, different ways to spell the same word, yet they mean the same.
    I do not follow American English as it is not my country. I cater to my own countries spellings, meanings and dialect...
When I visited Quebec City, a beautiful city, I was a little suprised how easy it was to get by in the English language. I was expecting resistance to me speaking English requiring me to speak French!


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 7:32 am

    Quoting citizen4722:
    What American-English or British-English words confuse you? - "Could care less" is said in America but "can't care less" is said in the UK. It means the same?...that's very confusing.
I always get confused by how positive and happy Americans seemingly are. It goes against my cynical, miserable grain!


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 7:34 am

    Quoting justskin1:
    Winston was so right about our language. Watching BBC programs has made me more British language literate and blog posts here have expanded my knowledge of the differences. I knew most but not all of the different terms you listed. Thank You.

    I am not sure if it is true but I read that when Webster compiled his dictionary he deliberately used different spellings to accent the differences between Britain and the US. He thought his take was superior. Still, not sure how so many items came to have such different names. I have come to try to abandon the term Fanny Pack, ie the pouch worn around the waist, since I learned that to you Brits, fanny does not mean bum but something a bit forward on a female.
That's interesting about you said about Webster.
Saying fanny pack here could get you in trouble here ... or even get you a nice surprise!


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 7:34 am

    Quoting staci_19702:
    I’m fascinated. It’s so interesting.
    I’m going to start saying maths from here on out!!
Maths it is then!


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 7:35 am

    Quoting MyBaffies:
    I wonder if it is due to the import of many American TV series (or seasons) over here.

    Do Americans pick up and use any British English words or do they just stick with their own?
American television has a lot to answer for in the words we use here.


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 8:46 am

    Quoting Paulxx001:
    Having been exposed to British humour — over here in the land of the maple 🍁 leaf — on TV and radio, there's not much that confuses me. I can see both sides of the coin.
    It helps to hear someone speak — then I'll know what they mean. I might read a sentence over; to be sure I have it right. 😊❗❗
It's been said the British humour takes some getting used to!


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 8:47 am

    Quoting  :

There's a lot of grammatically ignorant people in the UK as well!


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 8:52 am

    Quoting  :

Here a motorway is a four-or-six lane road, with hard shoulders, where you're allowed to drive faster, up to 70 miles per hour. Below motorways, we have A and B roads where the speed limit is 50 miles per hour; in urban areas the speed limit is further reduced to 30 miles per hour.
Arithmetic does get round the battle whether it's maths or math.


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 1:03 pm

    Quoting MustaschRide99:
    I once worked with a British Engineer from Singapore, and while sitting in a bar one night, he promptly announced he needed to go out for a fag! I had no idea he needed to go outside for a cigarette!
I can see why you were confused. It's a good job he didn't ask you to be his fag. With that question, he was wanting you to do whatever he wanted with you; a fag is also a boarding school term!
Thanks for stopping by.


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 1:05 pm

    Quoting PonyGirl1965:
    What American-English or British-English words confuse you? I don't think any mainstream words confuse me. I don't know all the British regional words. I'm learning.
    Do you say Maths or Math? Math
    Have you become more bilingual in American English and British English on blogland? Yes. I read enough books growing up to have all the basic words in my brain
Books are a great way of getting used to how different words are meant in English-speaking countries.


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 1:10 pm

    Quoting  :

You're right. It took me quite a while to understand what Americans meant by a backyard. A yard here is an outdoor paved or tarmacked enclosed area where things are stored or where people work. It's not a back garden.


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 1:12 pm

    Quoting pal334:
    After so many years in the military and travel to other countries I am much more comfortable with the languages. I use Math, just something more comforatble for me. I don't think I am bi lingual but I do enjoy it
Travel always means learning new words and new meanings to old words.


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 1:18 pm

    Quoting lok4fun500:
    I don't think aboot it!
    I say "math" ..................arithmetic when I was a youngster! but then, I'm Canadian!
There must be also quite a few differences between Canadian English and British English, though I suspect not as many as between American English and British English. I could be wrong though!


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/3/2021 1:20 pm

    Quoting cozzycouple:
    Oh the joy of it.
    There is American-English, all versions from each direction of the compass
    There is British - English
    The rest of British Isles speak another dialect of English all together
    The Canadians speak some form of English .... "aboat"
    Then you lot haven't dealt with Australian - English,
    commonly refered to as "Strine".
    Get your dictionaries out on that one, people
I understand American English far better than British English spoken by Glaswegians!
Thansk for stopping by.


lok4fun500 M  
51906 posts
11/3/2021 4:40 pm

    Quoting spunkycumfun:
    There must be also quite a few differences between Canadian English and British English, though I suspect not as many as between American English and British English. I could be wrong though!
There are several differences between Canadian and American English....e.g. we say pop, they say soda!


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/4/2021 12:46 am

    Quoting lok4fun500:
    There are several differences between Canadian and American English....e.g. we say pop, they say soda!
Here, pop means a fizzy drink and soda is fizzy water.


scoupe42 59M  

11/4/2021 8:05 am

    Quoting spunkycumfun:
    Winston Churchill once said, “Americans and British are one people separated by a common language.”
I agree 100% Good Blog.


spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41171 posts
11/4/2021 11:18 am

    Quoting scoupe42:
    I agree 100% Good Blog.
I'm pleased you liked the blog post.


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